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View Full Version : Martin Luther King is VERY POPULAR now that he's dead! Happy MLK Day.


5Reasons
01-15-2005, 09:26 AM
I just love it when neocons and others that hate blacks cite MLK as a model for blacks. When MLK was alive, whites HATED him - make NO MISTAKE ABOUT IT. It was only after a bullet entered Martin's head that whites came to appreciate him. Remember, it was MLK's nonviolent message that got him labled "the most dangerous man in America" by the neocon queen J. Edgar Hoover.

jazzyken
01-15-2005, 10:24 AM
Not appreciate him but acknowledge him!!! There is a diference.

ProSouth
01-15-2005, 04:30 PM
Also some ignorant, scared Black folks shunned MLK as well. Many baptist ministers were afraid to have King at their church out of fear of what white folks would do. I remember having a conversation some years ago with minister of that church over on Hawthorne and Seymour Ave. (I believe). He had pictures of him and King when he came to Newark in the 60s. He told me then that most Black ministers in Newark were afraid and even treated King as a troublemaker. Now you can't keep them from having MLK celebrations, ect. Hypocrites....
As far as white folks are concerned, anything that talks and walks non-violence and peace coming out of Black folks mouths they love.

5Reasons
01-15-2005, 04:43 PM
You're right, South. A lot of blacks were afraid to hang with MLK, especially after he took a stance against the Vietnam War.

counterattack
01-15-2005, 08:12 PM
Did you not say you where white? in an earlier post, if so I would like too know do you hate yourself? and I am asking you this as a blackman cause I don't understand your pro black stand if you have not gone through the same struggle, and before you respond being raised up as a white boy in the ghetto is not the same as being a blackman raised in the ghetto. also what part of newark where you raised? I come from a struggle a real tough one so let me know maybe we can converse on our upbringing.

5Reasons
01-15-2005, 09:33 PM
Dude, I am a BLACK relative of Strom Thurmond.

counterattack
01-16-2005, 12:02 PM
Have a good MLK DAY

JoefromPGH
01-17-2005, 03:24 PM
Wow! Maybe Blacks and Whites should communicate more because there seems to be a disconnection somewhere.

I can tell you this. There were a lot of Whites who respected and supported MLK and what he was doing. That even goes for my parents, who weren't by any means flaming liberals. But for the Whites who stood in the closet (it wasn't fashonable for a White person to tell the world that there was a real racial discrimination problem in our perfect America) and admired Reverend King, his death wasn't taken lightly.

I remember what turned my mother around. And it certainly taught me a very early lesson.I was about 7 or 8 years old (around 1961) and my Mom and I were sitting at McCrory's eating a dog. All of a sudden a white woman tapped a Black lady who we were sitting next to and told her in a very loud way...."I want your seat *****"." Both Mom and I were totally shocked but very happy when the Black lady refused to give up her seat. Not only that but the Black lady was willing to fight for her seat. The white woman (she was no LADY), got scared, said a few not so nice words and walked away.

I bring that up only because there were many of us Whites who could not live with this. We lived in an integrated neighborhood and it was really a nice place. But many of us learned indirectly how bad this country really was, especially down South but even here too. MLK meant a lot to any Whites who believed that people are equal no matter what color their skin is. Yes, we may have been the minority, but you may be surprised how large that minority really was.

May MLK rest in peace and may MLK's dream someday become reality!

5Reasons
01-17-2005, 03:35 PM
MLK's dream is worthwhile, however, I've come to wonder whether it is appropriate to celebrate MLK the way we do. I keep wondering if we continue to promote this all-powerful "black leader" (Moses type) model, whether or not it is beneficial. I truly believe that in a democracy that you don't need God-like leaders or, in this case, 'THE' leader. I truly believe that if we all do our small share, whether it is attending PTA meetings, volunteering at church to clean up certain streets or participating in coaching youth sports, that we can truly improve urban areas. The Moses model doesn't do much to empower the grassroots.

sportyjoe
01-17-2005, 03:53 PM
How many of those MLK hating white people are still alive? Why won't you stop dwelling on the past.

We certainly don't want to forget it, but quit throwing it in the faces of people that weren’t around and had no control of it.

As a proud white man I’m sick and tired of hearing blacks ranting about the past when I had absolutely nothing to do with it.

Work on today’s problems by learning from yesterday’s mistakes and move forward.

The more your blather 5, the more apparent it is you are a very immature and bigoted person. You can dislike, or as you prefer, hate people for their opinions, but why do you feel it necessary to resort to name calling? (Queen)

Grow up kid and get past all your hang ups!!

5Reasons
01-17-2005, 04:37 PM
Yet another post, in which I think I made a statement about uplifting blacks through community involvement (democracy) and Sporty is trying to draw me into a racial shouting match. (Note: I have sent a copy of your last post to the forum administrator.).

Here are the facts:

1. The neocons of the 60s hated MLK. That is a fact. Besides the fact that they labeled him a communist and J Edgar Hoover called him, "the most dangerous man in America." MLK was Hoover's great white whale. He tracked his every movement and tried his best to destroy him by sending tapes of his sexual encounters to his wife.

2. You say that those whites aren't around; I beg to differ. The whites that spit on the kids that integrated Little Rock High are still alive. The whites (teens) that participated in bombing the church in Burmingham are still alive. Even last week, we've seen a KKK leader from Mississippi that assisted in the killings of Cheney, Goodman and Scherner (sp?). Even the Emitt case is still yielding leads.

I've never blamed whites for anything. I've never advocated a policy that needed white approval OR participated in any so-called redistribution of wealth. (If you don't believe me, read my posts closely). I've always advocated simply, community-based plans to empower all people.

I did mention neocons because of the hypocracy in this matter. Necons of that day hated MLK. Today, they invoke his image and it's shameful. It's like when a neocon mentions JFK. Are you kidding me? The Cons hated JFK. On the very day that JFK was assisinated, the neocons of that day took out a full-page ad in a Texas newspaper calling for the impeachment of JFK because he was "weak on communism." For the next 25 years (in the pre-Rush booksale days) neocons turned anti-JFK books into a cottage industry. It is only in the last decade or so have the neocons come to steal JFK's legacy. And yet, I have no doubt if JFK was alive that he would agree far more with Ted Kennedy than Sean Hannity.

Finally, I did call J Edgar Hoover a queen, not because I'm anti-gay; but because I'm anti-rigthwing hypocracy. Hoover went after black leaders for over 50 years and he viewed the Civil Rights movement as evil and led by communists. Hoover used propaganda to promote his G-Men as his "ideal and pure" officers. Meanwhile in his private life, he had HIS LOVER as his number 1 homeland security chief (A 1940s through 60s Golan Cipel - you see, there are no new ideas under the sun) and he compromised HIMSELF even while he was alarming citizens of the "moral decay of the nation."

J Edgar Hoover was alarming Americans of a "Red Scare" during the early 60s, and yet HE KNEW that over 60% of the American Communists at that time were ON THE FBI payroll. The ones that weren't were almost ALL old idealist intellectuals. In other words, no national threat.

In the 1940s, he had the Red Scare bit going so good that we had to have all motion pictures screened to make sure they didn't have "communist content." Are you kidding me? In their wild hunt for communists in Hollywood, they even interviewed 10-year old Shirley Temple on what she knew of communists in town. Hollywood is still a favorite target of neocons...

J Edgar Hoover riddled our civil liberties and constitution for over 50 years and today we have buildings celebrating this man. He was the chief tool of the neocons during their early stages and yet they would have abhored his personal behavior.

I am trying to answer you in a civil tone. I hope you can participate in that fashion.

ProSouth
01-17-2005, 05:29 PM
Happy MLK Day to everyone here. Dr. King was a beautiful man with a great idea and vision. I must admit that I do not totally agree with all of his methods for obtaining fulfilling his great dream but my respect for him is unwavering. Dr. King was truly one of the greatest Americans to ever live. Despite all the United States government threw against him he pushed on until his murder. Today, Many Black leaders would sell out their mothers for a wet food stamp and the crumbs and scraps from the master's table.
He was a man and a true hero to all Americans.

ProSouth
01-17-2005, 06:39 PM
I can tell you this. There were a lot of Whites who respected and supported MLK and what he was doing. That even goes for my parents, who weren't by any means flaming liberals. But for the Whites who stood in the closet (it wasn't fashonable for a White person to tell the world that there was a real racial discrimination problem in our perfect America) and admired Reverend King, his death wasn't taken lightly.

I remember what turned my mother around. And it certainly taught me a very early lesson.I was about 7 or 8 years old (around 1961) and my Mom and I were sitting at McCrory's eating a dog. All of a sudden a white woman tapped a Black lady who we were sitting next to and told her in a very loud way...."I want your seat *****"." Both Mom and I were totally shocked but very happy when the Black lady refused to give up her seat. Not only that but the Black lady was willing to fight for her seat. The white woman (she was no LADY), got scared, said a few not so nice words and walked away.

I bring that up only because there were many of us Whites who could not live with this. We lived in an integrated neighborhood and it was really a nice place. But many of us learned indirectly how bad this country really was, especially down South but even here too. MLK meant a lot to any Whites who believed that people are equal no matter what color their skin is. Yes, we may have been the minority, but you may be surprised how large that minority really was. JoefromPGH:
Happy MLK Day. I liked your post especially the story about the incident in McCory's. This incident you described was common during that time. If that Black woman would not have stood her ground, she would have lost more than her seat, she would have lost her dignity and self respect to a woman who was clearly under some misconception that her white skin gave her priviledge over Black skin. But there was something else about your story which I observed. Eventhough you and your mom was totally shocked at the white woman's actions you both DID nothing. Now please don't take this the wrong way (I truly do have great respect for many of your posts, there is no negativity intended), but what took place in McCory's is the reason why that era of our history was so brutal and lasted so long. Many whites who sympathized with the discrimination and hatred that was perpetrated against Blacks were horrified by what they saw on the nightly news but did absolutely nothing about what they saw. If that white woman had attacked the Black woman for refusing to give up her seat would your mom had jumped in it to stop her? No disrespect to your mom but I don't think so. Now your parents probably never did anything negative or racial in any manner to any one of a different race however, doing nothing is just as bad.
The example you gave is exactly what goes on today: Good people standing by while injustice takes place around them. If your mom had intervened it probably would have at most meant her possible arrest or at least her being labeled a nigg** lover, ect. But at least she would have proved to the Black woman how appalled she was and would have given you as an 8 year olda very strong lesson of exactly what Dr. King said "If a man hasn't discovered something that he will die for, he isn't fit to live.
Whites were not the only offenders of inaction, Blacks, Black Ministers and Black leaders were also guilty of this. The inaction of Blacks during this time was 100 times worst than anything any white did not do.

Some other pertinent quotes that come to mind:

In the end, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.
Dr. Matrin Luther King, Jr.

The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it.
Albert Einstein

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.
Edmond Burke

JoefromPGH
01-17-2005, 07:04 PM
Pro...Good point.

I will say my Mom felt that her main job was to shield me from the argument (which, of course, she couldn't) but as I said, it was a lesson that I needed to learn. Funny thing is when I wrote that story I was thinking about the same thing. When things calmed down my Mom apologized to the Black lady but it was an uncomfortable situation for both of them.

ProSouth
01-17-2005, 07:37 PM
I'm sure it was a sticky situation. I'm sure it was not easy for your mom. See how racism effects us all in some way or another. Good hearted people like your mom (and probably many others in that era) felt like they were caught behind a rock in a hard place.

Peace...